Monthly Archives: July 2013

Diet For Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Nervous diarrhoea, spastic constipation and acute pain in the lower abdomen are common symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. The disorder is often stress-related. Although there is no cure for this disorder as yet, careful attention to diet and stress management helps keep symptoms under control.

Diet For Irritable Bowel Syndrome

If stress seems to trigger the symptoms, then a diary should be maintained to record the symptoms and the events associated with them. This would help clarify the connection between the two. Once the events or situations have been identified, ways to deal with them can be devised. Regular or vigorous exercise or any hobby may provide a hreak from stressful situations.

Diet

Eat fewer greasy, high-fat foods. Spicy foods bother some people. Instead of raw fibre, cooked fibre is better tolerated in case of an acute attack. For instance, vegetable soups are better than fruit juices; cooked vegetables are better than salads. Drink water instead of caffeine, alcohol or sugary drinks (they’re intestinal stimulants). In general, the diet is based on whether the main symptom is constipation or diarrhoea.

For constipation, add fibre to your diet in the form of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and pulses, and also increase the intake of water. Fibre absorbs water and softens the stools. Regular exercise also maintains bowel regularity.

For constipation, add fibre to your diet in the form of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and pulses, and also increase the intake of water. Fibre absorbs water and softens the stools. Regular exercise also maintains bowel regularity.

For diarrhoea, limiting the intake of certain foods helps, e.g., beans, cabbage, apples, citrus fruits, milk and milk products, coffee, tea, colas, chocolate, alcohol, spicy and fried foods.

Essentially, it’s getting to know about your body’s tolerance or intolerance for specific foods. Keep a track of what you can tolerate. A food diary may help figure out your food intolerance. Mint in any form has been found beneficial in an acute attack.